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Mental Disturbance



In 2019, 1 in every 8 people, or 970 million people around the world were living with a mental disorder, with anxiety and depressive disorders the most common (1). In 2020, the number of people living with anxiety and depressive disorders rose significantly\r\n because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Initial estimates show a 26% and 28% increase respectively for anxiety and major depressive disorders in just one year (2). While effective prevention and treatment options exist, most people with mental disorders\r\n do not have access to effective care. Many people also experience stigma, discrimination and violations of human rights.




mental disturbance



In 2019, 301 million people were living with an anxiety disorder including 58 million children and adolescents (1). Anxiety disorders are characterised by excessive fear and worry and related behavioural disturbances. Symptoms are severe enough\r\n to result in significant distress or significant impairment in functioning. There are several different kinds of anxiety disorders, such as: generalised anxiety disorder (characterised by excessive worry), panic disorder (characterised by panic attacks),\r\n social anxiety disorder (characterised by excessive fear and worry in social situations), separation anxiety disorder (characterised by excessive fear or anxiety about separation from those individuals to whom the person has a deep emotional bond),\r\n and others. Effective psychological treatment exists, and depending on the age and severity, medication may also be considered.


The prevalence of PTSD and other mental disorders is high in conflict-affected settings (3). PTSD may develop following exposure to an extremely threatening or horrific event or series of events. It is characterised by all of the following: 1) re-experiencing\r\n the traumatic event or events in the present (intrusive memories, flashbacks, or nightmares); 2) avoidance of thoughts and memories of the event(s), or avoidance of activities, situations, or people reminiscent of the event(s); and 3) persistent perceptions\r\n of heightened current threat. These symptoms persist for at least several weeks and cause significant impairment in functioning. Effective psychological treatment exists.


Neurodevelopmental disorders are behavioural and cognitive disorders, that? arise during the developmental period, and involve significant difficulties in the acquisition and execution of specific intellectual, motor, language, or social functions.


Neurodevelopmental disorders include disorders of intellectual development, autism spectrum disorder, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) amongst others. ADHD is characterised by a persistent pattern of inattention and/or hyperactivity-impulsivity\r\n that has a direct negative impact on academic, occupational, or social functioning. Disorders of intellectual development are characterised by significant limitations in intellectual functioning and adaptive behaviour, which refers to difficulties\r\n with everyday conceptual, social, and practical skills that are performed in daily life. Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) constitutes a diverse group of conditions characterised by some degree of difficulty with social communication\r\n and reciprocal social interaction, as well as persistent restricted, repetitive, and inflexible patterns of behaviour, interests, or activities.


Health systems have not yet adequately responded to the needs of people with mental disorders and are significantly under resourced. The gap between the need for treatment and its provision is wide all over the world; and is often poor in quality\r\n when delivered. For example, only 29% of people with psychosis (5) and only one third of people with depression receive formal mental health care (6).


People with mental disorders also require social support, including support in developing and maintaining personal, family, and social relationships. People with mental disorders may also need support for educational programmes, employment, housing,\r\n and participation in other meaningful activities.


WHO's Mental Health Gap Action Programme (mhGAP) uses evidence-based technical guidance, tools and training packages to expand services in countries, especially in resource-poor settings. It focuses on a prioritized set of conditions, directing capacity\r\n building towards non-specialized health-care providers in an integrated approach that promotes mental health at all levels of care. The WHO mhGAP Intervention Guide 2.0 is part of this Programme, and provides guidance for doctors, nurses, and\r\n other health workers in non-specialist health settings on assessment and management of mental disorders.


In 2019, 1 in every 8 people, or 970 million people around the world were living with a mental disorder, with anxiety and depressive disorders the most common (1). In 2020, the number of people living with anxiety and depressive disorders rose significantlybecause of the COVID-19 pandemic. Initial estimates show a 26% and 28% increase respectively for anxiety and major depressive disorders in just one year (2). While effective prevention and treatment options exist, most people with mental disordersdo not have access to effective care. Many people also experience stigma, discrimination and violations of human rights.


In 2019, 301 million people were living with an anxiety disorder including 58 million children and adolescents (1). Anxiety disorders are characterised by excessive fear and worry and related behavioural disturbances. Symptoms are severe enoughto result in significant distress or significant impairment in functioning. There are several different kinds of anxiety disorders, such as: generalised anxiety disorder (characterised by excessive worry), panic disorder (characterised by panic attacks),social anxiety disorder (characterised by excessive fear and worry in social situations), separation anxiety disorder (characterised by excessive fear or anxiety about separation from those individuals to whom the person has a deep emotional bond),and others. Effective psychological treatment exists, and depending on the age and severity, medication may also be considered.


The prevalence of PTSD and other mental disorders is high in conflict-affected settings (3). PTSD may develop following exposure to an extremely threatening or horrific event or series of events. It is characterised by all of the following: 1) re-experiencingthe traumatic event or events in the present (intrusive memories, flashbacks, or nightmares); 2) avoidance of thoughts and memories of the event(s), or avoidance of activities, situations, or people reminiscent of the event(s); and 3) persistent perceptionsof heightened current threat. These symptoms persist for at least several weeks and cause significant impairment in functioning. Effective psychological treatment exists.


Neurodevelopmental disorders include disorders of intellectual development, autism spectrum disorder, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) amongst others. ADHD is characterised by a persistent pattern of inattention and/or hyperactivity-impulsivitythat has a direct negative impact on academic, occupational, or social functioning. Disorders of intellectual development are characterised by significant limitations in intellectual functioning and adaptive behaviour, which refers to difficultieswith everyday conceptual, social, and practical skills that are performed in daily life. Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) constitutes a diverse group of conditions characterised by some degree of difficulty with social communicationand reciprocal social interaction, as well as persistent restricted, repetitive, and inflexible patterns of behaviour, interests, or activities.


Health systems have not yet adequately responded to the needs of people with mental disorders and are significantly under resourced. The gap between the need for treatment and its provision is wide all over the world; and is often poor in qualitywhen delivered. For example, only 29% of people with psychosis (5) and only one third of people with depression receive formal mental health care (6).


People with mental disorders also require social support, including support in developing and maintaining personal, family, and social relationships. People with mental disorders may also need support for educational programmes, employment, housing,and participation in other meaningful activities.


WHO's Mental Health Gap Action Programme (mhGAP) uses evidence-based technical guidance, tools and training packages to expand services in countries, especially in resource-poor settings. It focuses on a prioritized set of conditions, directing capacitybuilding towards non-specialized health-care providers in an integrated approach that promotes mental health at all levels of care. The WHO mhGAP Intervention Guide 2.0 is part of this Programme, and provides guidance for doctors, nurses, andother health workers in non-specialist health settings on assessment and management of mental disorders.


Many people have mental health concerns from time to time. But a mental health concern becomes a mental illness when ongoing signs and symptoms cause frequent stress and affect your ability to function.


A mental illness can make you miserable and can cause problems in your daily life, such as at school or work or in relationships. In most cases, symptoms can be managed with a combination of medications and talk therapy (psychotherapy).


If you have any signs or symptoms of a mental illness, see your primary care provider or a mental health professional. Most mental illnesses don't improve on their own, and if untreated, a mental illness may get worse over time and cause serious problems. 041b061a72


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